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Sunscreen, Other Measures Help Reduce Flare-Ups, Survey Shows

Although sun exposure may be the most common rosacea trigger, patients who take steps to protect their skin when outdoors have been successful in reducing rosacea outbreaks, according to a new National Rosacea Society patient survey. Virtually all of the 739 respondents said they make an effort to shield their skin from the sun, and 88 percent of those said their efforts had been successful or somewhat successful in reducing their rosacea flare-ups.

Q&A: In What Order? & Extensive Flushing

Q. I have special sunscreen, topical medication and special makeup. In what order should these three things be applied to my face?

A. From both medical and cosmetic standpoints, it makes much more sense to apply your medication before applying your sunscreen and makeup.

Q&A: Sunscreen & Dark Skin

Q. What kind of sunscreen should be used for people with rosacea?

A. Using sunscreen is especially important for rosacea patients, as sun exposure was named the top trigger for rosacea flare-ups by 81 percent of those responding to a National Rosacea Society survey.

Smart Sun Protection Keeps Flare-Ups Away

While many are aware that protection from sunlight is important to prevent skin cancer, rosacea patients have even further reason to minimize their exposure. In fact, beyond being the top trigger for rosacea flare-ups named by 81 percent of patients in a National Rosacea Society survey, researchers have found that sun exposure may be linked to the visible blood vessels (telangiectasia) often associated with rosacea.

Tips for Savvy Sunscreen Use

Since sun exposure is a common trigger factor for rosacea, proper sun protection may be a key to staying free of flare-ups this summer. Here are tips for using sunscreen this season and all year round.

Q&A: Controlling Blushing & Sunscreen and Medication

Q. Is there any way to control blushing? I feel handicapped when I am in a small group because I feel my whole face is glowing red.

A. Blushing is a common phenomenon, especially in people whose fair skin cannot hide the sudden onset of facial redness. It is often caused by emotions, but can also be triggered by a variety of environmental and other factors.

Sun Protection May Require Proper Sunscreen

While sun exposure is one of the most common trigger factors for flare-ups, finding a sunscreen that does not irritate the face can be a challenge for many rosacea sufferers.

"Individuals with rosacea are often uniquely sensitive to topical preparations applied to the face," said Dr. Mark Lebwohl, chairman of Dermatology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, at the recent annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology. "For this reason, attention to ingredients can help patients find products that work best for them."

Sunscreens Protect Against No. 1 Rosacea Trigger

The sun can be warm and invigorating, but for many rosacea sufferers, it's a reason to take special precautions. In fact, sun exposure was ranked as the leading rosacea trigger by 61 percent of rosacea patients in a National Rosacea Society survey.

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.