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Q&A: Sun Exposure and Aggravating Ingredients

Q. Is it common to break out in an itchy, bumpy rash (always on my forehead) after slight sun exposure?  Would sunscreen help prevent this?

A. In patient surveys, the sun ranks as the most common trigger for rosacea flare-ups, so it is likely that the sun is the culprit in your case. Even incidental exposure, such as running errands on a sunny day, might be enough to cause an outbreak of rosacea symptoms in some individuals.

Tips for Protecting Skin from the Sun

Sun exposure is a leading rosacea trigger, so here are some tips to help you to safely survive the spring and summer sun:

•  Find the right sunscreen formula.  There are two types of damaging rays: In general, UVA rays age skin; UVB rays burn it.  Not all sunscreens protect against both types, so look for non-chemical sunscreens that contain zinc or titanium dioxide and an SPF of 15 or higher.

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Sunscreen, Other Measures Help Reduce Flare-Ups, Survey Shows

Although sun exposure may be the most common rosacea trigger, patients who take steps to protect their skin when outdoors have been successful in reducing rosacea outbreaks, according to a new National Rosacea Society patient survey. Virtually all of the 739 respondents said they make an effort to shield their skin from the sun, and 88 percent of those said their efforts had been successful or somewhat successful in reducing their rosacea flare-ups.

Q&A: Sun Exposure & Vitamin D

Q. My flare-ups seem to be triggered primarily by sun exposure. Will a good sunscreen be enough to prevent flare-ups or must I always wear a hat when outside?

A. Because sun exposure is a leading flare-up trigger for so many, using sunscreen with an SPF (sun-protection factor) of 15 or higher is recommended for most rosacea patients all year-round -- but it is also important to avoid direct sunlight as much as possible.

Q&A: Tanning Beds & Caffeine

Q. Are tanning beds better or worse than the sun for rosacea patients?

A. In a National Rosacea Society (NRS) patient survey, sun exposure ranked as one of the most common rosacea triggers. At the same time, the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) has conducted a public awareness campaign to warn against the dangers of indoor tanning.

Tips for Protecting Yourself from Sun

Because sun exposure was cited as the most common rosacea trigger by 81 percent of patients responding to a National Rosacea Society survey, it may be important to remember a few things over the summer when sunlight is at its height. Here are some tips for protecting yourself from the sun:

 

  • Avoid the sun as much as possible. Limit the amount of time spent in direct sunlight, especially between the hours of 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., when sun is the strongest.

 

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Is It Rosacea -- or Just Sun Damage?

A poster presented at a recent meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology by Dr. Ronald Marks, professor emeritus at the University of Wales, raised the question of whether subtype 1 (erythematotelangiectatic) rosacea can be distinguished from sun-damaged skin.

Dr. Marks observed that patients with sun-damaged skin often exhibit facial redness and visible blood vessels, which are also symptomatic of subtype 1 rosacea.

Smart Sun Protection Keeps Flare-Ups Away

While many are aware that protection from sunlight is important to prevent skin cancer, rosacea patients have even further reason to minimize their exposure. In fact, beyond being the top trigger for rosacea flare-ups named by 81 percent of patients in a National Rosacea Society survey, researchers have found that sun exposure may be linked to the visible blood vessels (telangiectasia) often associated with rosacea.

Tips for Saying Bon Voyage to Vacation Rosacea Flare-Ups

Sure, you'll suspend your mail delivery and find a pet sitter, but you should also be sure to plan your trip with rosacea in mind. Depending on your individual sensitivities, the following suggestions can help lead to a much more enjoyable getaway.

 

  • Culprit #1. Avoid sun exposure, which affects more than 80 percent of rosacea sufferers. Minimize exposure from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. When you do venture out, use a UVA sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher. For sensitive skin, try a pediatric formulation or moisturizer mixed with sunscreen.

     

Tips for Savvy Sunscreen Use

Since sun exposure is a common trigger factor for rosacea, proper sun protection may be a key to staying free of flare-ups this summer. Here are tips for using sunscreen this season and all year round.

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.