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seborrheic dermatitis

Survey: Other Skin Conditions Often Present in Rosacea Patients

Although rosacea patients often have to cope with other skin disorders in addition to their rosacea, treatment for other conditions may tend to reduce rosacea flare-ups, according to a new survey by the National Rosacea Society.

Treating Rosacea and Seborrhea

Atopic dermatitis and seborrheic dermatitis may often occur at the same time as rosacea, said Dr. Guy Webster, clinical professor of dermatology at Jefferson Medical College, speaking on "What's new in rosacea?" during the recent annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD). Atopic dermatitis is a long-term (chronic) skin disorder that involves scaly and itchy rashes, and seborrheic dermatitis is a common inflammatory skin condition that causes flaky, white to yellowish scales to form on oily areas such as the scalp or inside the ear.

Q&A: Oily Skin a Precursor & Immune System Link

Q. Is oily skin usually a precursor to rosacea?

A. There is no evidence that oily skin leads to rosacea. Many rosacea patients experience dry skin, while others may have normal or oily skin, or both. The key is to use skin-care products and procedures that are suitable for your individual case.

Q. Has rosacea been linked to other diseases, particularly those relating to the immune system?

Rosacea Occurs with Seborrheic Dermatitis

According to a new study, rosacea is the most common facial skin disorder overlapping with seborrheic dermatitis (SD), a chronic and recurring inflammatory condition characterized by a red, scaly or itchy rash often found in the creases around the nose, the inner eyebrows or as dandruff on the scalp. Dr. James Del Rosso, clinical assistant professor of dermatology at the University of Nevada, found that 26 percent of rosacea patients had facial SD and 28 percent had SD of the scalp.1

Associated Reference

Survey Reveals Rosacea Patients Often Have Other Skin Conditions

Rosacea patients may often suffer from other skin conditions in addition to dealing with the effects of their rosacea, according to a new survey conducted by the National Rosacea Society.

"It's common for people to experience more than one skin condition, especially as they grow older," said Dr. James Del Rosso, clinical assistant professor of dermatology at the University of Nevada. "While the potential signs and symptoms of rosacea itself can be quite varied, it is important to consider the possibility of other skin disorders as well."

Doctors Unmask Rosacea Impostors to Formulate Appropriate Therapy

While a host of conditions can cause symptoms that may superficially resemble rosacea, dermatologists are increasingly able to pinpoint this widespread disorder and any concurrent conditions in order to tailor appropriate therapy for the individual patient. Proper diagnosis of rosacea can be especially important, since treatments for similar-appearing conditions can often make rosacea worse.

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Phone:
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Email:
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National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.