Rosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea SocietyRosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea Society

research

Computers May Be Used to Evaluate Facial Redness

Physicians and researchers may soon have a new computer-based process to help objectively assess the redness of subtype 1 (erythematotelangiectatic) rosacea, according to a recent report by researchers from the University of California-Davis.

Right now, the redness of rosacea is typically assessed visually by dermatologists using various scales to evaluate severity, such as the Clinician’s Erythema Assessment, a standard scale that has been demonstrated to be reliable in determining agreement among visual evaluations. Current assessments may also be assisted by photography.

Molecular Insight May Lead to New Advances in Rosacea Treatment

Kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs), a family of proteases recently identified as having a possible role in the development of rosacea, may help provide a pathway to controlling rosacea’s signs and symptoms, according to an article by Drs. Jan Fischer and Ulf Meyer-Hoffert of the University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein in Germany in the journal Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

Researcher Suggests Rosacea May Be the Result of a Protective Mutation

A researcher in Germany has proposed a novel unifying theory that may explain the molecular origin of rosacea in terms of climate adaptation. He contends that the new concept may not only explain why the disorder’s known triggers can cause flare-ups, but is also consistent with known therapeutic activity against rosacea’s signs and symptoms.

Study Finds Environmental & Genetic Factors in Rosacea

Genetics have long been thought to play a role in rosacea, but researchers have yet to isolate their influence. In one of the first studies of rosacea to measure and define genetic and environmental contributions, Dr. Daniel Popkin, assistant professor of dermatology at Case Western Reserve University, and colleagues have found that genetics and environmental factors may contribute equally to the disorder.

NRS Awards New Research Grants

The National Rosacea Society (NRS) announced it has awarded funding for three new studies, in addition to continuing support for two ongoing studies, as part of its research grants program to increase knowledge and understanding of the potential causes and other key aspects of rosacea that may lead to improvements in its treatment, prevention or potential cure.

Study Differentiates Rosacea from Sun Damage

A new study has documented for the first time the clinical differences between subtype 1 (erythematotelangiectatic) rosacea – characterized by facial redness and, sometimes, visible blood vessels – and a condition with visible blood vessels from sun damage known as telangiectatic photoaging (TP), providing a clear picture of the differences between the two disorders and aiding in appropriate treatment.1

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