• a
  • a
  • a
  • Adjust text size

research

NRS Research Grants Announced by NRS Medical Advisory Board

The National Rosacea Society (NRS) has awarded funding for three new studies in addition to continuing support for five ongoing studies as part of its research grants program to increase knowledge and understanding of the potential causes and other key aspects of rosacea.

Subtype 2 Rosacea Common in Tunisia

An analysis of hospital data in Tunisia found that subtype 2 (papulopustular) rosacea, characterized by redness with bumps and pimples, was the most commonly diagnosed form of rosacea in this Arab North African nation.1

New Study Identifies Cause of Flushing

Researchers have now identified the molecular pathway for flushing caused by niacin -- also known as vitamin B3 or nicotinic acid, and found in many foods -- according to a study recently completed by Dr. Robert Walters and colleagues at Duke University and funded by the National Rosacea Society. The new findings may lead to future improvements in the treatment or prevention of rosacea, which is commonly associated with flushing.

Threat of Bacterial Resistance Can Be Minimized in Rosacea

Improper use of oral antibiotics, including long-term use over months to years, has resulted in resistant bacteria that are posing a serious health threat, according to Dr. Theodore Rosen, professor of dermatology at Baylor College of Medicine, at a recent meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology. He also noted that alternative options are available that can minimize this risk.

NRS-Funded Studies Advance Knowledge of Rosacea's Causes

Many of the factors considered potential causes of rosacea are now coming into sharp focus as a result of medical studies funded by the National Rosacea Society (NRS) research grants program, and the growing body of scientific evidence is making major strides toward defining the precise development of this widespread disorder.

New Study Links Demodex and Eye Symptoms of Ocular Rosacea

A new study has found there may be a link between ocular rosacea and bacteria associated with Demodex mites, microscopic inhabitants of normal skin that tend to occur in much greater numbers in those with rosacea.

In the recently published study of 59 rosacea patients, Dr. Jianjing Li and colleagues at the Ocular Surface Center in Miami found a significant correlation between facial rosacea, infestation of the eyes with Demodex mites and reaction to certain mite-related organisms previously shown to stimulate an immune response in rosacea sufferers.1

National Rosacea Society Awards New Grants for Medical Research

The National Rosacea Society (NRS) has awarded funding to three new studies and continues to fund three ongoing studies as part of its research grants program to advance scientific knowledge of the potential causes and other key aspects of this often life-disruptive disorder.

Society Publishes New Standards for Optimal Patient Care

The National Rosacea Society (NRS) has published new standard patient care options for rosacea, developed by a consensus committee and review panel of 26 rosacea experts, and articles on the various options for controlling the many potential aspects of this widespread disorder will appear in the coming issues of Rosacea Review.1

Rosacea Patients May Be Prone to Allergies

Individuals with rosacea may have a greater propensity for allergic reactions, according to a poster presented at the recent meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology.1 Dermatologist Dr. Cheryl Ackerman, in private practice in Glen Ridge, N.J., noted that many of her rosacea patients were found to have allergic reactions to ingredients found in products used on their skin, and these were identified with patch testing.

She noted that in patients with rosacea, symptoms improved after the identified substance was avoided.

 

Studies Lead Toward Potential Therapies

Results of research funded by donations from members of the National Rosacea Society (NRS) are not only increasing medical understanding of the disorder, but are now revealing potential causes that may lead scientists toward important new advances in therapy.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - research

Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.