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NRS Funds Five New Rosacea Studies

The National Rosacea Society (NRS) has awarded funding for five new studies as part of its research grants program to increase knowledge and understanding of the potential causes and other key aspects of rosacea.

Chicken or Egg? Debate Continues

Demodex mites, the microscopic parasites that are normal inhabitants of facial skin, have long raised the question, "Which comes first, Demodex or rosacea?" as medical experts debate whether their increased numbers on rosacea patients are a cause or a result of the disorder. Now there may be some evidence that the "chicken" — Demodex mites — and not the "egg" comes first, according to a recent scientific report.

Behavior Therapy May Help Blushing

Individuals with severe rosacea are often anxious about the social consequences of blushing and may benefit from cognitive behavioral therapy, according to a recent study published in the journal Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy.1

To evaluate the psychological and social impacts of rosacea, 31 patients completed five standard psychological questionnaires, according to researchers Dr. Daphne Su and Dr. Peter Drummond, Murdoch University, Perth, Australia.

New NRS-Funded Studies Open Way for Advances in Treatment

Two recent studies, funded by individual donations to the National Rosacea Society (NRS), have discovered potential key factors in the development of rosacea that open new possibilities for important advances in its treatment and prevention.

A malfunction in part of the body's nervous system may be linked to the redness as well as the bumps and pimples of rosacea, according to a recently completed study by Dr. Akihiko Ikoma and colleagues at the University of California-San Francisco.

Nerve Symptoms May Present New Subset

Individuals with prominent neurologic symptoms might be considered a subset of rosacea, according to a report by Dr. Tiffany Scharschmidt and colleagues at the department of dermatology, University of California-San Francisco.1

In their study of 14 rosacea patients, the researchers found that a high percentage had neurologic (43 percent) or neuropsychiatric (50 percent) conditions such as headaches, depression, essential tremor and obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Dry Eye May Signal Ocular Rosacea

Eye symptoms are common in rosacea patients and eye dryness is an early sign of subtype 4 (ocular) rosacea, according to a study published in the Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.1

Noting that the prevalence of eye involvement in rosacea is probably higher than often presumed, Dr. E. Lazaridou and colleagues of the Aristotle University Medical School, Thessalonika, Greece, examined 100 rosacea patients for ocular signs and symptoms using two tests to determine the presence of eye dryness.

NRS Research Grants Announced by NRS Medical Advisory Board

The National Rosacea Society (NRS) has awarded funding for three new studies in addition to continuing support for five ongoing studies as part of its research grants program to increase knowledge and understanding of the potential causes and other key aspects of rosacea.

Subtype 2 Rosacea Common in Tunisia

An analysis of hospital data in Tunisia found that subtype 2 (papulopustular) rosacea, characterized by redness with bumps and pimples, was the most commonly diagnosed form of rosacea in this Arab North African nation.1

New Study Identifies Cause of Flushing

Researchers have now identified the molecular pathway for flushing caused by niacin -- also known as vitamin B3 or nicotinic acid, and found in many foods -- according to a study recently completed by Dr. Robert Walters and colleagues at Duke University and funded by the National Rosacea Society. The new findings may lead to future improvements in the treatment or prevention of rosacea, which is commonly associated with flushing.

Threat of Bacterial Resistance Can Be Minimized in Rosacea

Improper use of oral antibiotics, including long-term use over months to years, has resulted in resistant bacteria that are posing a serious health threat, according to Dr. Theodore Rosen, professor of dermatology at Baylor College of Medicine, at a recent meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology. He also noted that alternative options are available that can minimize this risk.


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National Rosacea Society
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Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.