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Q&A

Q&A: Winter Rosacea & Ocular Rosacea and Contacts

Q. Although I have rosacea, the symptoms only appear in the winter, not during the summer. Is it possible to have "winter rosacea"?

A. While many rosacea patients are affected by environmental factors that change with the seasons, what affects one person may not affect another. It may be that you are particularly sensitive to wind or frigid weather and these winter elements aggravate your rosacea.

Q&A: Menopause & Contagion

Q. Will my rosacea disappear after menopause, or will it last for the rest of my life?

A. While the hot flashes many women experience just prior to and during menopause often trigger signs and symptoms of rosacea, they are not necessarily the underlying cause of this disorder. Once your hot flashes subside, the signs and symptoms may continue, and may be associated with many other potential factors.

Q&A: Eyelids & Hydrocortisone Rash

Q. Can rosacea be on the inside of your eyelids?

Q&A: Permanent Facial Redness & Rosacea in 20s

Q. Does each flare-up increase my chances of permanent facial redness?

Q&A: Topical Medication Expiration & Laser Treatment for Bumps

Q. How long is a topical medication effective? I think I have had my tube for a while, and it isn't working.

Q&A: Sunscreen & Dark Skin

Q. What kind of sunscreen should be used for people with rosacea?

A. Using sunscreen is especially important for rosacea patients, as sun exposure was named the top trigger for rosacea flare-ups by 81 percent of those responding to a National Rosacea Society survey.

Q&A: Oily Skin a Precursor & Immune System Link

Q. Is oily skin usually a precursor to rosacea?

A. There is no evidence that oily skin leads to rosacea. Many rosacea patients experience dry skin, while others may have normal or oily skin, or both. The key is to use skin-care products and procedures that are suitable for your individual case.

Q. Has rosacea been linked to other diseases, particularly those relating to the immune system?

Q&A: Cooking with Wine & Anti-Inflammatory Medications

Q: Is wine used in cooking, wherein the alcohol has evaporated, still considered a rosacea trigger?

A. It stands to reason that wine may not affect your rosacea if the alcohol is removed in cooking. However, as with all rosacea triggers, what affects one person may not affect another. If wine affects your rosacea, the only way to know for sure whether its residue in cooking is also a trigger is to try it to determine your sensitivity.

Q&A: Tanning Beds & Caffeine

Q. Are tanning beds better or worse than the sun for rosacea patients?

A. In a National Rosacea Society (NRS) patient survey, sun exposure ranked as one of the most common rosacea triggers. At the same time, the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) has conducted a public awareness campaign to warn against the dangers of indoor tanning.

Q&A: Spa Treatments & Disease vs. Sydrome

Q: Should I avoid day spa treatments such as facials, exfoliation and steaming if I have rosacea?

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.