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ocular rosacea

Dry Eye Symptoms May Worsen in Winter Weather

Although scientific information about ocular rosacea continues to increase, many rosacea patients themselves may fail to recognize their eye symptoms could be related to this disorder and needlessly suffer, especially during harsh weather, according to Dr. Guy Webster, clinical professor of dermatology at Thomas Jefferson Medical School.

New Concepts Presented at AAD Annual Meeting

New information about the causes of eye irritation in rosacea and proper skin care were among the rosacea-related topics presented to dermatologists attending the recent 71st annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) in Miami Beach.

Q&A: Eyelash Loss & Migraine Headaches

Q. I’ve been treated for rosacea for almost a year, and my eyelashes are almost nonexistent. Could this be connected to the rosacea?

A. Rosacea patients who suffer from the eye symptoms of subtype 4 (ocular) rosacea may experience blockage of oil glands, inflammation and crusting around the eyelashes.

Researchers Make Advances in Understanding of Ocular Rosacea

A new technique for improving the eye symptoms of ocular rosacea, a possible biochemical clue to its diagnosis and a potential link between Demodex and the development of corneal ulcers are among the advances from National Rosacea Society-funded researchers to appear in recent medical journals.

Tips for Easing Ocular Rosacea

Sufferers of ocular rosacea, a subtype characterized by irritated eyes, may find their symptoms worsen during unpredictable spring weather. Here are some tips to help ease your seasonal discomfort:

Q&A: Ear Involvement & Intestinal Bacteria

Q. My ears have been weeping and draining for three years. I was diagnosed with ocular and regular rosacea a year ago. Is there such a thing as inner ear rosacea?

A. Rosacea is primarily a disorder of the facial skin, but it may also occur on the skin of other parts of the body such as the neck, chest, scalp or ears. However, there is not good evidence in medical literature linking rosacea to symptoms of the inner ear.

Dry Eye May Signal Ocular Rosacea

Eye symptoms are common in rosacea patients and eye dryness is an early sign of subtype 4 (ocular) rosacea, according to a study published in the Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.1

Noting that the prevalence of eye involvement in rosacea is probably higher than often presumed, Dr. E. Lazaridou and colleagues of the Aristotle University Medical School, Thessalonika, Greece, examined 100 rosacea patients for ocular signs and symptoms using two tests to determine the presence of eye dryness.

Teacher Regains Sight After Rosacea Diagnosis

Schoolteachers are legendary for their "eagle eyes" — their uncanny ability to see a note being passed in the last row or a piece of chewing gum being placed surreptitiously in a student's mouth. So it was for Barbara Brown, a retired teacher from Virginia, until about four years ago when she began to experience severe eye irritation.

"It started with what I thought was an eye infection," Barbara said. "I got some ointment from my doctor, but it didn't get any better. He finally sent me to a specialist who diagnosed my problem as ocular rosacea."

NRS Research Grants Announced by NRS Medical Advisory Board

The National Rosacea Society (NRS) has awarded funding for three new studies in addition to continuing support for five ongoing studies as part of its research grants program to increase knowledge and understanding of the potential causes and other key aspects of rosacea.

Eye Irritation Needs Special Attention

Soothing cleansing and other measures in addition to medical therapy may help relieve the symptoms of subtype 4 (ocular) rosacea, according to the standard management options for rosacea recently published by the National Rosacea Society (NRS).

"Gentle care in keeping eyelids clean is especially important in keeping eyes with ocular rosacea healthy," said Dr. Marian Macsai, professor of ophthalmology at the University of Chicago and a member of the consensus committee and review panel of 26 medical experts who developed the new standard options.1

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Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.