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menopause

Q&A: Menopause & Contagion

Q. Will my rosacea disappear after menopause, or will it last for the rest of my life?

A. While the hot flashes many women experience just prior to and during menopause often trigger signs and symptoms of rosacea, they are not necessarily the underlying cause of this disorder. Once your hot flashes subside, the signs and symptoms may continue, and may be associated with many other potential factors.

Women May Need Added Therapy

Rosacea can be a trying condition under the best of circumstances, but it can be particularly vexing to women during menopause and even their monthly cycle.

Many women report more flushing episodes and increased numbers of bumps and pimples during these times, according to Dr. Wilma Bergfeld, head of the clinical research section of the dermatology department at Cleveland Clinic and former president of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Q&A: Menopause & Location

Q. Is there any relationship between the onset of menopause and the beginning of rosacea?

A. While the cause of rosacea remains unknown, its signs and symptoms, especially the flushing characteristic of subtype 1 (erythematotelangiectatic) rosacea, may initially be noted while women are experiencing menopause. In these cases, alleviating the underlying flushing may help keep rosacea under control.

Rosacea Linked with Increase in Migraine

Women with rosacea may be more likely to experience migraine headaches than those without rosacea, according to findings reported in the medical journal Dermatology.1

In a study of 809 randomly selected workers, Drs. M. Berg and S. Liden of the Department of Dermatology at Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden reported that 14 percent had experienced migraine, and that it was significantly more common in women.

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.