• a
  • a
  • a
  • Adjust text size

eyes

New Concepts Presented at AAD Annual Meeting

New information about the causes of eye irritation in rosacea and proper skin care were among the rosacea-related topics presented to dermatologists attending the recent 71st annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) in Miami Beach.

Eye Irritation Needs Special Attention

Soothing cleansing and other measures in addition to medical therapy may help relieve the symptoms of subtype 4 (ocular) rosacea, according to the standard management options for rosacea recently published by the National Rosacea Society (NRS).

"Gentle care in keeping eyelids clean is especially important in keeping eyes with ocular rosacea healthy," said Dr. Marian Macsai, professor of ophthalmology at the University of Chicago and a member of the consensus committee and review panel of 26 medical experts who developed the new standard options.1

Q&A: Eyelids & Hydrocortisone Rash

Q. Can rosacea be on the inside of your eyelids?

Special Care, New Technology Aid Ocular Rosacea

Special care may be needed for rosacea patients with severe forms of ocular rosacea, according to Dr. Sandra Cremers, instructor of ophthalmology at Harvard Medical School. As part of a National Rosacea Society (NRS) research grant, she recently developed a scoring system to identify severe cases of this rosacea subtype, which may affect half of all rosacea patients.

Key Steps Can Soothe Dry Eye in Winter

If you're bothered by irritation, burning or a gritty feeling and redness in your eyes, you're not alone. Winter can bring a host of special challenges for rosacea patients, and the effects of dry eye head the list for many.

"Millions of people suffer from dry eye, and it accounts for 17 percent of all ophthalmologic visits," said Dr. Marian Macsai, chairman of ophthalmology at Northwestern University. "We definitely see more of it during the winter months because of the dryness of the environment, and it often accompanies rosacea."

Q&A: Contacts and Ocular Rosacea & Burning Ears

Q.Is it safe for someone with ocular rosacea to wear contact lenses?

A. Anyone with ocular rosacea should consult their physician about the safety of wearing contact lenses in their particular case. Depending on the individual, the symptoms of ocular rosacea may make wearing contact lenses problematic.

Q&A: Eyes in Winter & Pregnancy

Q. Rosacea seems to affect my eyes more in the winter. Is there anything I can do?

A. Wind and cold temperatures may cause irritation and increase the watery discharge associated with ocular rosacea (eye symptoms)1. Besides limiting time outdoors during winter, patients with ocular rosacea can protect their eyes from icy blasts by wearing ultraviolet protective glasses or sunglasses.

Eye Symptoms Call for Special Care

Red eyes often go hand in hand with red faces for many people with rosacea, as many develop the ocular form of the disorder in addition to facial symptoms. Fortunately, the effects of ocular rosacea can be successfully controlled with medical help and appropriate eye care.

In a recent National Rosacea Society survey, 61 percent of nearly 1,400 respondents said they had suffered eye symptoms such as a watery or bloodshot appearance, a gritty feeling, or burning or itching.

Eye Symptoms of Rosacea Often Left Undiagnosed, Survey Shows

A new survey by the National Rosacea Society suggests that common symptoms known as ocular rosacea, which can cause irritation or redness in the eyes of rosacea patients, may be significantly underdiagnosed.

Eye Symptoms May Separate Lupus, Rosacea

While the facial effects of rosacea and lupus may sometimes be confused, the presence of eye symptoms may point definitely to rosacea, as it almost never occurs in lupus flares.

"The presence of ocular involvement can be very helpful in differentiating active lupus from active rosacea," said Dr. Guy Webster, associate professor of dermatology at Jefferson Medical College.

Tags:

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - eyes

Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.