• a
  • a
  • a
  • Adjust text size

erythematotelangiectatic rosacea

Neuropeptide May Play Role in Pain and Flushing

According to a study funded by the National Rosacea Society, researchers have found a potential connection between the nervous system and the redness and stinging of subtype 1 (erythematotelangiectatic) rosacea.

Drs. Ferda Cevikbas and Martin Steinhoff, University of California-San Francisco, noted that the flushed face of rosacea is often accompanied by stinging and burning, signs of nerve activation. They theorized this may signal a dysfunction in communication between the nerves and the vascular system.

Subtype 1 Rosacea Needs Special Care

Because the flushing and facial redness of subtype 1 (erythematotelangiectatic) rosacea are difficult to treat with medical therapy, other measures may be especially important for successfully controlling this widespread form of rosacea, according to the standard management options for rosacea recently published by the National Rosacea Society (NRS).1

National Rosacea Society Awards New Grants for Rosacea Research

The National Rosacea Society (NRS) has awarded funding for four new studies as part of its research grants program to advance scientific knowledge of the potential causes and other key aspects of this chronic and potentially life-disruptive disorder that affects an estimated 14 million Americans.

Is It Rosacea -- or Just Sun Damage?

A poster presented at a recent meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology by Dr. Ronald Marks, professor emeritus at the University of Wales, raised the question of whether subtype 1 (erythematotelangiectatic) rosacea can be distinguished from sun-damaged skin.

Dr. Marks observed that patients with sun-damaged skin often exhibit facial redness and visible blood vessels, which are also symptomatic of subtype 1 rosacea.

Subscribe to RSS - erythematotelangiectatic rosacea

Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.