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contact lenses

Q&A: Winter Rosacea & Ocular Rosacea and Contacts

Q. Although I have rosacea, the symptoms only appear in the winter, not during the summer. Is it possible to have "winter rosacea"?

A. While many rosacea patients are affected by environmental factors that change with the seasons, what affects one person may not affect another. It may be that you are particularly sensitive to wind or frigid weather and these winter elements aggravate your rosacea.

Ocular Rosacea Doesn't Rule Out Contact Lenses

Most rosacea patients who exhibit signs and symptoms of ocular rosacea can still safely wear contact lenses, according to a recent article in Review of Ophthalmology by Dr. Mark Mannis, chairman of ophthalmology at the University of California-Davis.1 He emphasized that if eye doctors take steps to minimize inflammation of the eyelid and the eye itself and to stabilize the tear film prior to fitting the lenses, ocular rosacea patients should not suffer any discomfort or damage to the eye surface.

Q&A: Contacts and Ocular Rosacea & Burning Ears

Q.Is it safe for someone with ocular rosacea to wear contact lenses?

A. Anyone with ocular rosacea should consult their physician about the safety of wearing contact lenses in their particular case. Depending on the individual, the symptoms of ocular rosacea may make wearing contact lenses problematic.

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.