• a
  • a
  • a
  • Adjust text size

Rosacea Review: Winter 2013

Rosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea Society

Acne and rosacea can share common features, and accurate diagnosis is especially important because antibiotic resistance is a growing concern worldwide, according to Dr. Hilary Baldwin, associate professor of dermatology at the State University of New York-Brooklyn.1

While cold blustery weather and ever-advancing age can make dry skin a menace for rosacea patients, medical therapy and careful skin care can help manage and control this problem, according to Dr. Doris Day, clinical assistant professor of dermatology at New York University.

Q. I’ve been treated for rosacea for almost a year, and my eyelashes are almost nonexistent. Could this be connected to the rosacea?

A. Rosacea patients who suffer from the eye symptoms of subtype 4 (ocular) rosacea may experience blockage of oil glands, inflammation and crusting around the eyelashes.

Although rosacea patients often have to cope with other skin disorders in addition to their rosacea, treatment for other conditions may tend to reduce rosacea flare-ups, according to a new survey by the National Rosacea Society.

While the list of potential lifestyle and environmental factors that may aggravate rosacea is long – ranging from sun and wind to spicy foods, heavy exercise and heated beverages – not everyone is affected by them all. With a little detective work, you can identify and avoid only those things that affect your individual case.

Researchers have found in a small study that those with rosacea were more aware of and embarrassed by blushing than those without the disorder.1

Drs. Peter Drummond and Daphne Su, Murdoch University, Perth, Australia, monitored changes in forehead blood flow with laser Doppler fluxmetry in 31 rosacea patients and in 86 individuals without rosacea while singing, giving an impromptu speech and listening to recordings of these activities.

Rosacea in skin of color is uncommon but not rare, according to Dr. Andrew Alexis, assistant clinical professor of dermatology at Columbia University, during the annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology.

“The features of rosacea – transient redness that becomes more permanent – may be subtle and difficult to detect, especially on an individual with very dark skin,” he said. But patients may report flushing or a sensation of warmth in response to typical rosacea trigger factors as well as an intolerance of many products applied to facial skin, he noted.

When Jennie McCollum began suffering breakouts of bumps and pimples about 15 years ago, she felt as if she were turning 16 all over again and reliving the angst of teenage acne. Fortunately, her dermatologist was able to correctly diagnose her skin condition as rosacea, and he started the now 68-year-old retired nurse from Alabama on rosacea therapy.

Issues

Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.