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The Many Faces of Rosacea

Rosacea can vary substantially from one patient to another. The following photographs reflect common patterns of signs and symptoms, known as subtypes, and many patients have characteristics of more than one subtype at the same time.

A full listing of the potential signs and symptoms of rosacea can be found on All About Rosacea, along with descriptions of the subtypes. These include subtype 1 (erythematotelangiectatic) rosacea, subtype 2 (papulopustular) rosacea, subtype 3 (phymatous) rosacea and subtype 4 (ocular) rosacea.

Subtype 1: Facial Redness (Erythematotelangiectatic Rosacea)

Rosacea sufferers often experience flushing and persistent facial redness. Small blood vessels may also become visible in some patients, and stinging, burning, swelling and roughness or scaling may occur.

Subtype 2: Bumps and Pimples (Papulopustular Rosacea)

In addition to persistent redness, bumps (papules) and/or pimples (pustules) are common in many rosacea sufferers. Some patients may also experience raised red patches known as plaques.

Subtype 3: Enlargement of the Nose (Phymatous Rosacea)

Rosacea may be associated with enlargement of the nose from excess tissue, a condition known as rhinophyma. This may include thickening of the skin and irregular surface nodules, which in rare cases may also develop in areas other than the nose.

Subtype 4: Eye Irritation (Ocular Rosacea)

Rosacea affects the eyes in many patients, and may result in a watery or bloodshot appearance, irritation and burning or stinging. The eyelids may also become swollen, and styes are common.

Acknowledgements: Patient photos were supplied by Dr. Joseph Bikowski, assistant clinical professor of Dermatology, University of Pittsburgh; and Dr. Jerome Z. Litt, assistant clinical professor of Dermatology, Case Western Reserve University.

Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.