Break the Ice with Your Rosacea

Posted: 12/14/2015

If you have rosacea, it’s likely that you’ve had someone comment on your signs and symptoms at some point in your life. Although these comments can occasionally be rude or hurtful, most of the time people are just curious or concerned and unaware of this conspicuous condition. During this time of year when socializing peaks, here are some tips for educating people about your rosacea:

Be proactive. If you are experiencing a flare-up and your symptoms are obvious, don’t leave the elephant in the room to do all the talking. If you take the initiative to inform others about the disorder, it may keep them from speculating about the cause of your red face or bumps and pimples, such as cleanliness or that you drink too much.

Add humor. If appropriate, take the chance to be light-hearted about your rosacea, especially if you need an opportunity to bring it up to a new colleague or friend. Sometimes people may be uncomfortable discussing a topic they are not familiar with, and adding humor can help ease into the conversation. If the person has never heard of the condition, you can now explain it with less awkwardness.

Don't overreact. Whether you receive a comment or find yourself the object of a lingering stare, try not to respond emotionally. Instead, use this as an opportunity to educate others. Many people are unaware of rosacea, and knowledge leads to understanding.

Stand confident. Body language sometimes registers more than the physical features we place so much emphasis on. If you project positivity through your stance and movement, and carry a warm smile, people will more than likely see right past what you think is your biggest flaw.

Social Media Editor: Emma Terhaar

Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.