Fall 2017

Research May Add to Ocular Rosacea Therapy Choices

While avoidance of trigger factors, gentle cleansing and a variety of medical therapies are among today’s options for controlling ocular rosacea, continuing research on its pathophysiology is uncovering potential avenues for the development of important new advances in its treatment, according to Dr. Edward Wladis, associate professor and vice-chairman of ophthalmology at Albany Medical College, in a recent article in the medical journal Survey of Ophthalmology.1

Diagnosing Rosacea in Darker Skin Can Often be Difficult

While the treatment may be the same as in lighter skin, diagnosing rosacea in patients with dark skin types may be more challenging, according to Dr. Andrew Alexis, associate professor of dermatology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, during a session at the summer meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology in New York.

Changes in Skin Microbiota May Affect Rosacea Development

The ways in which disruptions and imbalances in the ecosystem of bacteria, Demodex mites and other microorganisms on the skin, known collectively as the skin microbiota, may be involved in the development of rosacea were discussed at the summer meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology in New York.

Survey: Patients’ Facial Cleansing Routines Vary

Results from a new National Rosacea Society survey found that most rosacea patients practice a thorough and gentle facial hygiene routine that involves washing twice daily with warm water and a non-soap cleanser, and blotting their face dry with a towel. 

Sixty-five percent of the 719 rosacea patients surveyed said they wash their face twice daily in the morning and evening. Sixteen percent said they wash their face once daily in the morning, while 14 percent wash their face once daily in the evening. Only around 3 percent of patients washed their face less often than once daily.

Rosacea Through the Ages: a Timeline

When the National Rosacea Society was founded 25 years ago, very few Americans were aware of this chronic skin disorder, even though it’s now estimated to affect more than 16 million in the U.S. alone. Here is a timeline that traces the recorded history of rosacea in art, literature and medical texts up to the present: 

New NRS Grants Awarded for Rosacea Research

The National Rosacea Society (NRS) has awarded funding for three new studies, in addition to continuing support for three ongoing studies.

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Phone:
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Email:
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National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.