Summer 2016

New Ocular Rosacea Studies Help Define Disease Process

Two recent small studies on ocular rosacea yielded new findings that help in understanding its manifestations as well as the disease process.

Researchers at Kirikkale University in Turkey found that despite a high incidence of dry eye in individuals with rosacea, corneal and conjunctival sensitivity were not significantly different from those of the eyes of individuals without the disorder. This is the first time to their knowledge that such a study has been conducted.1

Tips for Rosacea Trigger-Free Living

You know how it is. You’re going about your daily life when bam! Your rosacea flares up. While it may not be possible to avoid everything that might trigger a sudden increase in signs and symptoms, here are some ways to keep flare-ups to a minimum.

Know your triggers. Once you have uncovered the lifestyle and environmental factors that contribute to your flare-ups, you have a much better chance of controlling your condition. The NRS provides a diary to help identify and avoid those factors that affect your individual case.

Survey Shows Rosacea Patients Often Use More Than One Medical Therapy

As with other chronic disorders that may involve multiple symptoms, a new NRS survey of 1,534 rosacea patients has documented that more than one therapy is often used over the course of managing the condition.

Nearly 80 percent of respondents reported that they had been prescribed more than one medication for their rosacea. Twenty-five percent had been prescribed two medications over the course of treatment, while 22 percent had used three and 29 percent four or more. 

New Research on Comorbidities Extends Scientific Knowledge

The surge of scientific studies linking rosacea and a wide variety of other medical disorders, called comorbidities, may have been inspired by similar findings about another skin disorder, according to Dr. Sewon Kang, chairman of dermatology at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine and a member of the NRS Medical Advisory Board.

Rosacea Linked to a Higher Risk of Parkinson's and Alzheimer's Diseases

Editor’s note: This issue contains reports of interesting new findings on rosacea and other diseases. It’s important to note that these findings only suggest a potential association. To determine any cause and effect relationship, further study is required.

New studies have now shown potential links between rosacea and increased risk of the nervous system disorders Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases, in addition to a growing number of other medical conditions.1,2

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
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National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.