Rosacea Review: Summer 2018

Rosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea Society

Researchers have attempted to determine the global prevalence of this widespread disorder for the first time.

Many recent studies that have found associations between rosacea and increased risk for cardiovascular disease, gastrointestinal dis- ease, autoimmune diseases and certain cancers, among a growing number of systemic diseases.

A recent National Rosacea Society survey on doctor-patient communication revealed that while many patients are getting the information they need, there’s still room for improvement—for both physicians and patients.

While rosacea may make some patients want to tear their proverbial hair out, a recent small study discovered a potential association between the disorder and a form of progressive hair loss in women. 

We try to explain scientific studies in plain, easy-to-understand language, but some terms may still need additional explanation.

Headshots are no longer a “nice to have,” they are a “must-have.”

Published by the National Rosacea Society.
Editor: Dr. Lynn Drake, Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School.
Managing Editor: Andrew Huff.

Rosacea Review is a newsletter published by the National Rosacea Society for people with rosacea. The newsletter covers information pertaining to the disease and its control, including news on research, results of patient surveys, success stories, lifestyle and environmental factors, and tips on managing its signs and symptoms. To receive Rosacea Review by mail, please join the NRS. You can also sign up to receive the newsletter by email.

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.