Rosacea Review: Winter 2017

Rosacea Review - Newsletter of the National Rosacea Society

While the warmer months are known to be difficult for many rosacea sufferers, wintertime poses its own challenges, and more than a third of rosacea patients have said it’s the hardest season of the year. 

Recent studies in the United Kingdom, South Korea and Denmark have found significant associations between rosacea and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

Emotional stress can be difficult to define. It’s an invisible, immeasurable force that can exist in nearly every facet of our day-to-day lives, even if we are not aware of it. Living in a state of stress can impact both mental and physical health – causing muscle tension, making the heart and lungs to work harder, upsetting digestion and releasing hormones that affect the brain and reproductive systems. 

A new survey conducted by the NRS found that most rosacea patients have experienced some social repercussions due to rosacea’s impact on their facial appearance. 

“Rosacea can have a profound effect on the emotional and social lives of those who suffer from this very visible yet poorly understood condition,” said Samuel Huff, executive director of the NRS. 

Researchers in Denmark have reported a potential link between rosacea and migraine headaches, finding an association between the two conditions particularly in women over the age of 50. A relationship between the two conditions has been hypothesized for the past 30 years, but only a handful of studies, mostly with limited sample sizes, have investigated the potential connection. 

Before the advent of modern medicine, it was commonly believed that rosacea was a side effect of excessive drinking. Today, of course, we know that rosacea is not a symptom of alcoholism, nor is there any reason to think that people with rosacea necessarily drink more than the average adult — in fact, even a teetotaler may have the condition. 

Yet despite the increased information and awareness about rosacea, the misconception persists. Ruddy cheeks and bumps and pimples were even used in the recent film Girl on the Train to telegraph the protagonist’s struggle with alcohol. 

Published by the National Rosacea Society.
Editor: Dr. Lynn Drake, Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School.
Managing Editor: Andrew Huff.

Rosacea Review is a newsletter published by the National Rosacea Society for people with rosacea. The newsletter covers information pertaining to the disease and its control, including news on research, results of patient surveys, success stories, lifestyle and environmental factors, and tips on managing its signs and symptoms. To receive Rosacea Review by mail, or to change your mailing address, please click on the subscriptions link on the left.

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The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.