News Releases

The National Rosacea Society (NRS) has designated April as Rosacea Awareness Month to alert the public to the early warning signs of this chronic and conspicuous facial disorder now estimated to affect more than 16 million Americans.

BARRINGTON, Illinois (February 4, 2016) – While it is well established that individuals with rosacea often face significant physical, emotional and social challenges, new studies are now showing this widespread disorder may also be associated with increased risks of cardiovascular disease, gastrointestinal disease, certain types of cancer and many other systemic illnesses.

ATLANTA (December 17, 2015) -- Medical scientists reviewed research on the microbiome, genetics and pathophysiology of rosacea and presented results of new studies funded by the National Rosacea Society (NRS) during its research workshop at the Society for Investigative Dermatology annual meeting here.

BARRINGTON, Illinois (September 29, 2015) – The National Rosacea Society (NRS) announced it has awarded funding for three new studies, in addition to continuing support for two ongoing studies, as part of its research grants program to increase knowledge and understanding of the causes and other key aspects of rosacea that may lead to improvements in its treatment, prevention or potential cure.

SAN FRANCISCO (July 30, 2015) – As research continues to reveal the many ways the human microbiome may affect human health, the potential role of Demodex mites in rosacea has come into sharper focus with new technology and may point to new approaches in patient care, according to experts at a roundtable on the clinical implications of Demodex in rosacea during the recent annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology.

FT. WORTH, TX, May 28, 2015 – Galderma Laboratories, L.P., and the National Rosacea Society (NRS) today announced the launch of Break Up with Your Makeup, an educational campaign and contest to empower those with rosacea to feel more confident in their own skin. According to results of a new national survey, the impacts of rosacea go more than skin deep, with half of sufferers saying they feel unattractive due to the condition. Nearly one quarter of patients (23 percent) also admit that they turn to cosmetics instead of treatment when symptoms strike, and nearly half (49 percent) say they mistook their rosacea for acne before they were correctly diagnosed. Since lack of treatment as well as certain makeups can actually worsen rosacea symptoms, there is a clear need for greater education about this complex disease.

Although the underlying cause or causes of rosacea have yet to be discovered, this unsightly and embarrassing condition can now be successfully controlled with medical therapy and lifestyle modifications to avoid those factors that may aggravate or trigger its signs and symptoms.

While sipping hot coffee, running laps or a day at the beach may cause the average person to flush harmlessly, such innocuous deeds can wreak havoc on the face of a rosacea sufferer. Because rosacea is characterized by flare-ups and remissions as it grows increasingly more severe, sufferers of this conspicuous and embarrassing disorder are advised to identify and avoid those factors that seem to aggravate their individual conditions.

CHICAGO (April 1, 2015)  Like a mosaic slowly gaining definition and becoming clear, so too is the scientific understanding of the potential causes of rosacea. April has been designated as Rosacea Awareness Month by the National Rosacea Society (NRS) to educate the public on the warning signs of this chronic but treatable facial disorder now estimated to affect more than 16 million Americans. 

There's nothing like a red face to get people to notice you – for all the wrong reasons. On first encounter, they may wonder whether it's shyness, alcohol or poor hygiene that is responsible for a nose or cheeks as red as Vermont in autumn, or pimples that look like they should have disappeared after your high school prom.

"Why me?" is a question many ask when they find themselves with the embarrassing effects of rosacea -- which may include facial redness, visible blood vessels, bumps, pimples, eye irritation and other symptoms if left untreated. While rosacea can strike all segments of the population, surveys by the National Rosacea Society have revealed a profile of those most at risk for this conspicuous and increasingly common condition:

Patty couldn't imagine there might be a medical reason for her red puffy nose. She did think it was strange, however, that the redness seemed to appear after drinking coffee.

A bank officer, Patty started noticing the redness after her morning coffee break. "My colleagues started making comments," she said. "I was concerned because in my position, I was constantly before the public."

BARRINGTON, Illinois (February 4, 2015) – While researchers continue to make progress in understanding the disease process of rosacea, lack of public awareness of the disorder remains a stumbling block to its control. The National Rosacea Society (NRS) has designated April as Rosacea Awareness Month to educate the public on the warning signs of this chronic and widespread facial condition now estimated to affect more than 16 million Americans.

 

BARRINGTON, Illinois (January 22, 2015) -- The National Rosacea Society (NRS) announced it has awarded funding for three new studies, in addition to continuing support for two ongoing studies, as part of its research grants program to increase knowledge and understanding of the potential causes and other key aspects of rosacea.

CHICAGO (April 1, 2014) -- April has been designated Rosacea Awareness Month by the NRS to alert the public to the early warning signs of this conspicuous, red-faced disorder now estimated to affect more than 16 million Americans.

BARRINGTON, Illinois (February 3, 2014) – The National Rosacea Society (NRS) has designated April as Rosacea Awareness Month to educate the public on the impact of this chronic and widespread facial disorder now estimated to affect more than 16 million Americans.

BARRINGTON, Illinois (January 15, 2014) – The emotional impact of rosacea is often substantial regardless of subtype or severity, according to results of a new survey of 1,675 rosacea patients conducted by the National Rosacea Society. 

BARRINGTON, Illinois (November 12, 2013) – The National Rosacea Society (NRS) announced it has awarded funding for two new studies, in addition to continuing support for five ongoing studies during the year, as part of its research grants program.

BARRINGTON, Illinois (October 09, 2013) -- Although the progression of rosacea can vary substantially from one individual to another, flushing and persistent redness are by far the most common early signs of the disorder, according to a new survey conducted by the National Rosacea Society.

BARRINGTON, Illinois (September 4, 2013) – Residents of New England appear to suffer the highest incidence of rosacea in the United States, while those in Hawaii may be affected the least, according to a geographic analysis of National Rosacea Society (NRS) membership data. 

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The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.