Summer 2015

Tips for Tracking Rosacea Triggers

Identifying and avoiding things that trigger symptoms in your individual case can help you to control your condition. Here are three easy ways to start tracking:

Study Differentiates Rosacea from Sun Damage

A new study has documented for the first time the clinical differences between subtype 1 (erythematotelangiectatic) rosacea – characterized by facial redness and, sometimes, visible blood vessels – and a condition with visible blood vessels from sun damage known as telangiectatic photoaging (TP), providing a clear picture of the differences between the two disorders and aiding in appropriate treatment.1

Scientists Find New Pathway for Therapy

In a recent study funded by the National Rosacea Society, Dr. Yoshikazu Uchida, research dermatologist at the University of California – San Francisco, and colleagues overcame a challenge that may lead to important advances in the treatment of rosacea.

New Studies Discuss Significance of Demodex in Rosacea Care

As research continues to reveal the many ways the human microbiome may affect human health, the potential role of Demodex mites in rosacea has come into sharper focus with new technology and may point to new approaches in patient care, according to experts at a roundtable on the clinical implications of Demodex in rosacea.

Genetic Variants May Link to Rosacea

While it has long been observed that rosacea may tend to run in families, the first genome-wide association study of rosacea may have discovered the genetic variants that are linked to this chronic skin disorder – as well as potential connections between rosacea and certain autoimmune disorders.1

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.