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Rosacea in Children

Posted: 03/06/2008

Although rosacea rarely appears in children, its potential occurrence should be considered during medical examinations because of the possible severity of ocular (eye) involvement, according to a report in the February 2008 issue of the Archives of Dermatology. Researchers Dr. Mélanie Chamaillard and colleagues at the National Reference Center for Rare Skin Disorders, Bordeaux, France, suggested that an ophthalmologic (eye) examination be carried out for all children with skin signs of rosacea.

The signs and symptoms of ocular rosacea in children may be frequently underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed, the researchers said. They examined the records of 20 children with rosacea from 1½ to 14 years old, and noted that though most had minor ocular involvement, five had more serious eye manifestations that if undetected could lead to severe infection and visual impairment.

Reference
Chamaillard M, Mortemousque B, Boralevi F, Marques da Costa C, Aitali F, Taïeb A, Léauté-Labrèze C. Cutaneous and ocular signs of childhood rosacea. Archives of Dermatology 2008;144:167-171.

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