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Posted: 11/19/2012

Welcome to the new rosacea.org! The National Rosacea Society (NRS) has updated both the design of our website and the technology powering it to be of greater service to you.

Posted: 11/14/2012

The Fall Rosacea Review is now online at rosacea.org. This issue announces five new research grant awards, part of the National Rosacea Society’s ongoing commitment to supporting medical research and funded by donations from thousands of rosacea sufferers. The newsletter also recaps recent developments in the understanding and treatment of ocular rosacea.

Posted: 10/24/2012

According to a study funded by the National Rosacea Society, researchers have found a potential connection between the nervous system and the redness and stinging of subtype 1 (erythematotelangiectatic) rosacea.

Posted: 10/08/2012

Most rosacea patients feel the negative social impact of their condition regardless of which rosacea subtype they may have, according to the results of the latest National Rosacea Society (NRS) survey.

Posted: 09/20/2012

A new technique for improving the eye symptoms of ocular rosacea, a possible biochemical clue to its diagnosis and a potential link between Demodex mites and the development of corneal ulcers are among the advances from National Rosacea Society-funded researchers to appear in recent medical journals.

Posted: 09/11/2012

David Letterman read an unusual Top Ten list on the Feb. 3, 1999 episode of "The Late Show": "Divas or Presidential Skin Conditions."  Rosacea is, of course, on the list as President Bill Clinton's doctors had revealed his rosacea.

Posted: 09/06/2012

The National Rosacea Society marks its 20th anniversary in 2012, and is pleased to report on the vast ongoing progress that has been made toward fulfilling its mission of improving the lives of people with rosacea through awareness, education and support of medical research.

Posted: 08/16/2012

The Summer Rosacea Review is now online at rosacea.org. This issue celebrates the 20th anniversary of the National Rosacea Society and its ongoing commitment to improving the lives of people with rosacea through awareness, education and support of medical research. The newsletter also recaps a research analysis that attempts to answer a question that has long vexed the scientific community: Which comes first – rosacea or Demodex mites?

Posted: 08/02/2012

Your dermatologist can be your best defense in keeping your rosacea at bay. Make sure your dermatologist has the best information possible on your physical condition. Here are some tips to maximize your office visits...

Posted: 07/19/2012

While the conspicuous red face and blemishes of rosacea can be embarrassing enough, they tell only part of the story as a new survey conducted by the National Rosacea Society (NRS) shows that significant physical discomfort often accompanies the visible signs of this widespread disorder now estimated to affect more than 16 million Americans.

Posted: 07/05/2012

Demodex mites, the microscopic parasites that are normal inhabitants of facial skin, have long raised the question, “Which comes first, Demodex or rosacea?” as medical experts debate whether their increased numbers on rosacea patients are a cause or a result of the disorder, and now there may be some evidence that the “chicken” — Demodex mites — and not the “egg” comes first, according to a recent scientific report.

Posted: 06/21/2012

Although sun exposure may be the most common rosacea trigger, patients who take steps to protect their skin when outdoors have been successful in reducing rosacea outbreaks, according to a new National Rosacea Society patient survey. Virtually all of the 739 respondents said they make an effort to shield their skin from the sun, and 88 percent of those said their efforts had been successful or somewhat successful in reducing their rosacea flare-ups.

Posted: 06/11/2012

In February of 1999, the popular news magazine "Inside Edition" covered rosacea, noting that the threat of impeachment might have been causing President Bill Clinton's rosacea to flare up.

Posted: 06/07/2012

Sufferers of ocular rosacea, a subtype characterized by irritated eyes, may find their symptoms worsen during certain seasons of the year. Here are some tips to help ease your discomfort:

  • Block the wind. Wear glasses or sunglasses when you have to go outdoors to protect your eyes from the wind. Shielding your face with a wide-brimmed hat or umbrella may also help.
Posted: 05/17/2012

The Spring Rosacea Review is now online at rosacea.org. This issue covers the efforts of the National Rosacea Society to raise awareness on the effects of rosacea beyond personal appearance, such as emotional stress and physical pain, and features treatment options for rosacea patients who suffer from rhinophyma (subtype 3 rosacea).

Posted: 05/03/2012

Rosacea and Seborrhea. Atopic dermatitis and seborrheic dermatitis may often occur at the same time as rosacea, said Dr. Guy Webster, clinical professor of dermatology at Jefferson Medical College, speaking on “What’s new in rosacea?” during the recent annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD).

Posted: 04/09/2012

In this archive television clip from WNBC-TV in June of 1989, rosacea is said to be "no laughing matter."  W.C. Fields' iconic red nose leads into a description of rosacea's signature symptoms, as explained by Dr. Jonathan Wilkin, long-time chairman of the National Rosacea Society's Medical Advisory Board, which oversees the NRS research grants program.

Posted: 04/04/2012

In this 1989 video, you'll see one of the earliest TV news stories about rosacea. Dr. Art Ulene on NBC's "TODAY" Show explains what rosacea is and how it could be treated.

Posted: 04/02/2012

While rosacea has become increasingly recognized as a common and conspicuous red-faced disorder, mounting evidence has shown that it can cause far more emotional stress and physical pain than previously known. April has been designated as Rosacea Awareness Month by the National Rosacea Society (NRS) to alert the public to the warning signs of this chronic and often progressive condition now estimated to affect more than 16 million Americans.

Posted: 03/22/2012

While the ravages of subtype 3 (phymatous) rosacea have been well documented throughout history, today a multitude of options are available to restore a red, swollen or bumpy nose (rhinophyma) to normal appearance.

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Email:
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National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.