• a
  • a
  • a
  • Adjust text size

Fall 2004

Tips for Routine Facial Cleansing

In addition to medical therapy, a gentle twice-daily facial cleansing routine can help keep your rosacea under control. Here are some tips that will leave your skin clean without aggravating your condition.

  • Use a very mild soap or non-soap cleanser. Any products that might irritate skin are not useful.
  • Massage cleanser with your fingertips. A soft pad or washcloth may also be gently used, but patients should avoid rough or abrasive materials, loofahs, brushes or sponges.

Rosacea Occurs with Seborrheic Dermatitis

According to a new study, rosacea is the most common facial skin disorder overlapping with seborrheic dermatitis (SD), a chronic and recurring inflammatory condition characterized by a red, scaly or itchy rash often found in the creases around the nose, the inner eyebrows or as dandruff on the scalp. Dr. James Del Rosso, clinical assistant professor of dermatology at the University of Nevada, found that 26 percent of rosacea patients had facial SD and 28 percent had SD of the scalp.1

Associated Reference

New System Introduced for Assessing Rosacea

The National Rosacea Society has introduced the first standard grading system for the study and clinical assessment of rosacea, developed by a consensus committee and review panel of 17 rosacea experts worldwide and recently published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.1

Q&A: How Close to a Cure?

Q. Is there any general medical opinion on how many years away we are from finding a cure for rosacea?

A. No one can predict how long it might take to find and develop a cure for rosacea, but through ongoing medical research significant progress is being made at determining its underlying cause or causes. This is usually the first step in discovering a cure or prevention for a disease.

Tags:

New Survey Shows Rosacea Tends to Evolve Beyond One Subtype

Although rosacea has been classified into four common patterns of signs and symptoms known as subtypes, most rosacea patients experience a progression in their disorder from one subtype to another, according to a new survey by the National Rosacea Society.

In the survey of 1,231 rosacea patients, 72 percent reported that their rosacea had evolved from one subtype to another, and 77 percent said they had experienced more than one subtype at the same time.

Scientists Reveal New Advances in Understanding Common Disorder

Medical scientists from around the world reported on their progress in studies funded by the National Rosacea Society (NRS) to uncover potential causes and other key aspects of the disorder during the fifth annual rosacea research workshop, held in conjunction with the annual meeting of the Society for Investigative Dermatology. The NRS conducts the workshop to promote interest in studying rosacea and to share new information from ongoing studies.

Subscribe to RSS - Fall 2004

Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.