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Winter 2008

Women May Need Added Therapy

Rosacea can be a trying condition under the best of circumstances, but it can be particularly vexing to women during menopause and even their monthly cycle.

Many women report more flushing episodes and increased numbers of bumps and pimples during these times, according to Dr. Wilma Bergfeld, head of the clinical research section of the dermatology department at Cleveland Clinic and former president of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Study Shows Mite-Related Bacteria May Induce Rosacea Bumps, Pimples

Although they are normal inhabitants of human skin and cannot be seen, microscopic mites known as Demodex folliculorum may actually be something to blush about, as a new study funded by the National Rosacea Society demonstrated for the first time that these invisible organisms may be a cause or exacerbating factor in rosacea.1

Tips for Talking with Your Doctor

Your dermatologist can be your strongest ally in the battle to keep your rosacea under control. Here are some tips to maximize your benefit from each office visit:

  • Be prepared. If you have questions or concerns, write them down ahead of time so you don't forget to discuss any of them.

  • "Out of sight" should not mean "out of mind." Be sure to alert your doctor about any signs or symptoms that cannot be seen, such as eye discomfort or skin that stings or burns.

Many Specialists Provide Care

While rosacea is usually treated by a dermatologist, a new survey by the National Rosacea Society suggests that other health specialists are often the first to notice a patient might have the disorder.

In the survey of 1,584 rosacea patients, 38 percent said a non-dermatologist first noticed their condition and 26 percent were referred to a specialist. Nearly 73 percent of the latter were referred to a dermatologist, and 12 percent were referred to an eye doctor for treatment of ocular rosacea.

Q&A: Permanent Facial Redness & Rosacea in 20s

Q. Does each flare-up increase my chances of permanent facial redness?

Her Commitment to Therapy Keeps Rosacea at Bay

For years, Heidi Nunnally was treated for what her doctor said was acne, but her skin never seemed to get better.

"I felt like a leper. I was embarrassed to go out in public," said the 44-year-old legal secretary. It was only after she was correctly diagnosed with rosacea seven years ago that she finally was able to regain a clear complexion and her self-confidence.

National Rosacea Society Awards New Grants for Rosacea Research

The National Rosacea Society (NRS) has awarded funding for four new studies as part of its research grants program to advance scientific knowledge of the potential causes and other key aspects of this chronic and potentially life-disruptive disorder that affects an estimated 14 million Americans.

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.