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Summer 2008

Seeking Aid of Specialist Pays Off with Clear Vision

Robert Angsten, an Arizona retiree, had symptoms of rosacea for about six years when his wife first noticed some redness in the area of his cheekbones. A dermatologist diagnosed the condition as rosacea. Typical of older men, however, he was unconcerned about his complexion and viewed the rosacea as little more than a nuisance until it began to affect his vision.

Careful Detective Work Helps Manage Rosacea

In addition to complying with medical therapy, an important part of managing rosacea for many patients is to identify and avoid environmental and lifestyle factors that may trigger or aggravate their individual conditions.

Finding Causes of Rosacea Seen as Most Important to Patients

Areas of rosacea research deemed most important by patients are the potential causes of the skin disorder, followed closely by research on eye symptoms and the progression of the condition, according to a survey conducted by the National Rosacea Society (NRS).

Q&A: Sunscreen & Dark Skin

Q. What kind of sunscreen should be used for people with rosacea?

A. Using sunscreen is especially important for rosacea patients, as sun exposure was named the top trigger for rosacea flare-ups by 81 percent of those responding to a National Rosacea Society survey.

Tips for Applying Topical Medication

Doctors frequently prescribe topical therapy to control the bumps and pimples of rosacea. Here are some tips to get the maximum benefit from your medication by incorporating it into your skin-care routine.

  • Start clean. Wash your face each morning with a very mild or non-soap cleanser, being careful not to scrub or irritate the skin. Rinse with lukewarm water.

  • Gently blot dry. Pat your face with a soft, thick-pile towel. Don't pull, tug, scrape or scratch. Allow any remaining dampness to air dry.

Check Eyes in Kids

Although rosacea rarely appears in children, its potential occurrence should be considered during medical examinations because of the possible severity of ocular (eye) involvement, according to a report in the Archives of Dermatology.1

Cinnamon Awareness

In a report of one patient, cinnamon was potentially linked to an increase in severity of the patient's rosacea, according to a report in the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology.1

Researchers Dr. Tracy Campbell and colleagues at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago reported that a woman with diabetes and mild papulopustular rosacea on the nose experienced a sudden spread of symptoms from her eyelids to her chin after using 500-mg cinnamon supplements to help control blood sugar levels.

Scientists Trace Rosacea Triggers to Discover Sources of Symptoms

From exposure to heat to cigarette smoking, new studies are tracing the effects of rosacea triggers in the search for the cause or causes of this widespread, often life-disruptive disorder.

In interim results of a new study funded by the National Rosacea Society, Dr. Kent Keyser, professor of vision sciences, University of Alabama at Birmingham, noted that nicotine may be linked to the redness and visible blood vessels of rosacea.

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.