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Spring 2009

Family History, Sun Linked to Rosacea

Both a blistering sunburn and a family history of rosacea were associated with the presence of rosacea, according to study results presented by Dr. Alexa Boer Kimball, associate professor of dermatology at Harvard Medical School, at the recent annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology.1

Patient Overcomes Five-Year Break in Medical Therapy

Andrea considered herself somewhat fortunate when she was diagnosed with rosacea about 15 years ago because her doctor worked closely with her to find just the right combination of medications and skin care products for her sensitive skin. The 46-year-old Russian translator from Maryland often stood in front of large crowds when she performed simultaneous interpretations, and she was grateful that she was able to keep her condition under control with oral and topical therapy.

Rosacea Patients Cite Summer as Season for Most Aggravations

While people often consider the warm weather and endless sun of summer true delights, new survey results suggest that many rosacea patients are likely to describe the season in much less glowing terms.

Nearly 85 percent of the 1,190 respondents to a recent National Rosacea Society (NRS) survey said their condition is affected by the change in seasons, and almost half said their symptoms are at their worst when the warm weather arrives. Forty-six percent also said they have to make the most lifestyle adjustments during this time to reduce the likelihood of a flare-up.

Essential Steps Help Keep Rosacea at Bay

Though rosacea's signs and symptoms may often be unpredictable and frustrating, three basic practices - adherence to medical therapy, avoiding triggers and gentle skin care - can help bring it under control on a long-term basis.

"Patients must first make a strong commitment to long-term medical therapy," said Dr. Boni Elewski, vice chair of dermatology at the University of Alabama - Birmingham.

Q&A: Eyelids & Hydrocortisone Rash

Q. Can rosacea be on the inside of your eyelids?

Tips for Handling Hurtful Comments

Facial burning and stinging are common symptoms of rosacea, but many rosacea patients also feel an emotional sting when acquaintances or even strangers make insensitive comments about their condition. Here are some tips for dealing with those awkward situations.

 

  • Don't overreact. Whether you receive a comment or find yourself the object of a lingering stare during a flare-up, try not to respond emotionally. Instead, use this as an opportunity to educate others. Many people are unaware of rosacea, and knowledge leads to understanding.

 

National Rosacea Society Awards New Grants for Medical Research

The National Rosacea Society (NRS) has awarded funding to four new studies as part of its research grants program to advance scientific knowledge of the potential causes and other key aspects of this chronic and potentially life-disruptive disorder.

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.