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Summer 2009

Beauty Expert Offers Advice for Looking Your Best at All Times

The best offense against a common skin problem such as rosacea is a strong defense, according to Charla Krupp, noted beauty expert and best-selling author, in offering some "makeup makeover" tips and other advice to help rosacea sufferers look their best.

One of the first and most important steps a rosacea patient should take is to ask his or her dermatologist for help in formulating a skin-care plan as early in treatment as possible, Ms. Krupp said. "The average woman spends $100 on beauty products each month, and trial and error is just too expensive."

She Manages 'Classic Case' with Therapy, Makeup

Despite her background as a registered nurse, Judy Heimann was stumped when her first signs of rosacea appeared about 12 years ago.

"I had redness and stinging, but I also had small fluid-filled sacs hanging from my cheeks," said Judy, who is now in her mid-50s and works in the insurance industry in New York. "I thought I had herpes zoster or some contagious disease."

Surveys Show Need for More Education

New online surveys of the general population, developed with the National Rosacea Society, point to a need for greater education about this often life-disruptive disorder.

In a survey of 500 people who had not been diagnosed with rosacea, more than 30 percent did not know what rosacea was, and only 14 percent said they were familiar or very familiar with its symptoms. However, when asked how important the appearance of their skin was to them, 87 percent said it was important or very important.

Tips for Avoiding Summer Flare-Ups

Summer can be a troublesome time for rosacea sufferers, as avoiding some of the most common rosacea triggers -- the sun, hot weather and humidity -- requires special attention. Follow these tips for a successful summer season.

 

  • Know your triggers. If you have identified the lifestyle and environmental factors that contribute to your flare-ups, you have a better chance of controlling your condition.

 

Q&A: Menopause & Contagion

Q. Will my rosacea disappear after menopause, or will it last for the rest of my life?

A. While the hot flashes many women experience just prior to and during menopause often trigger signs and symptoms of rosacea, they are not necessarily the underlying cause of this disorder. Once your hot flashes subside, the signs and symptoms may continue, and may be associated with many other potential factors.

Rosacea Trigger Aids Medical Research

The same biochemical process that causes people to flush when alarmed or embarrassed may be linked to the development of rosacea, according to findings presented by Dr. Richard Granstein, chairman of dermatology at Cornell University, during the recent Society for Investigative Dermatology annual meeting.

Rosacea Awareness Month Brings Condition into Public Spotlight

As if today's economy were not stressful enough, growing millions of Americans now face the disruption of a poorly understood condition that can wreak havoc on their emotional, social and professional lives. April was designated as Rosacea Awareness Month by the National Rosacea Society (NRS) to alert the public to the warning signs of this chronic but treatable disorder now estimated to affect well over 14 million Americans.

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.