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Summer 2011

Tips for Healthy, Beautiful Skin

Rosacea patients often must take special precautions in caring for their sensitive skin. Here are some tips for healthier looking skin recommended by physicians.

 

  • Avoid beauty and skin-care products that sting, burn or itch. Read product labels to avoid ingredients that may irritate your individual condition.

 

Q&A: Itching Disrupts Sleep & Safe Skin-Care Products

Q. I have itching due to rosacea that occurs during the evening and disrupts my sleep. What can I do to alleviate this itching?

A. Sleeping in a room that is too warm often causes itching. A fan or air conditioner may help alleviate this.

The itching also may be caused by overly dry skin or by skin-care products. Avoid rubbing and scratching, which may bring immediate relief but can make matters worse.

Dry Eye May Signal Ocular Rosacea

Eye symptoms are common in rosacea patients and eye dryness is an early sign of subtype 4 (ocular) rosacea, according to a study published in the Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.1

Noting that the prevalence of eye involvement in rosacea is probably higher than often presumed, Dr. E. Lazaridou and colleagues of the Aristotle University Medical School, Thessalonika, Greece, examined 100 rosacea patients for ocular signs and symptoms using two tests to determine the presence of eye dryness.

Teacher Regains Sight After Rosacea Diagnosis

Schoolteachers are legendary for their "eagle eyes" — their uncanny ability to see a note being passed in the last row or a piece of chewing gum being placed surreptitiously in a student's mouth. So it was for Barbara Brown, a retired teacher from Virginia, until about four years ago when she began to experience severe eye irritation.

"It started with what I thought was an eye infection," Barbara said. "I got some ointment from my doctor, but it didn't get any better. He finally sent me to a specialist who diagnosed my problem as ocular rosacea."

Rosacea Takes Toll on Sufferers in the Workplace, Survey Shows

Unless effectively controlled, rosacea can play havoc on job interactions and employment, according to a new survey by the National Rosacea Society (NRS) on the impact in the workplace of this widespread, red-faced disorder now estimated to affect more than 16 million Americans.

Find Right Triggers to Control Rosacea

While medical therapy is an essential weapon in the battle against rosacea, identifying and avoiding the right lifestyle and environmental factors that may aggravate the disorder can be a critical tactic to include in the arsenal. In National Rosacea Society (NRS) surveys of patients who pinpointed and steered clear of their personal rosacea triggers, more than 90 percent reported that this had reduced their rosacea flare-ups.

NRS Research Grants Announced by NRS Medical Advisory Board

The National Rosacea Society (NRS) has awarded funding for three new studies in addition to continuing support for five ongoing studies as part of its research grants program to increase knowledge and understanding of the potential causes and other key aspects of rosacea.

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Contact Us

Phone:
1-888-NO-BLUSH
Email:
rosaceas@aol.com
National Rosacea Society
196 James St.
Barrington, IL 60010

Our Mission

The National Rosacea Society is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to improve the lives of people with rosacea by raising awareness, providing public health information and supporting medical research on this widespread but little-known disorder. The information the Society provides should not be considered medical advice, nor is it intended to replace

consultation with a qualified physician. The Society does not evaluate, endorse or recommend any particular medications, products, equipment or treatments. Rosacea may vary substantially from one patient to another, and treatment must be tailored by a physician for each individual case. For more information, visit About Us.